Digressions: Where No Foot Has Trod

Posted on July 2, 2012. Filed under: General Interest, MIM4.5a, Philosophy | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Your word for th daymuse = someone who is a source of inspiration

The old Greeks had them. Muses, I mean.  In earlier posts, I touched on them, even if somewhat irreverently.  For the Ancients, they explained what moved that most remote recess of Self, the mysterious Psyche, to elicit from it the creative urges and even the dark manifestations that we call the  human spirit.

For most of my life, I didn’t have a Muse.  But, I had a love of poetry, so I guess you could say that Erato was my nominal, default Muse.  In verse, I could take “the road less traveled,” and “rise with eagles” to “touch the face of God.”  By finding reflections of my own inexpressible feelings toward this torture we call Life, it gave comfort that I had fellow travelers on a journey I just knew would, somehow, end badly.  But, what the heck…   eat, drink, and be merry…   right?

In spite of the Muses, in spite of the poetry, not all that emanates from the Psyche is definable.  There is the unexplained, a pathos that darkens the soul, a heaviness that ensconces the heart making its every beat a Herculean task.  An aching that surges to unbearable fullness, then ebbs, only to surge again; a vast emptiness that hovers just beyond feeling, where echoes fade like  diaphanous whispers into infinite nothingness. 

A poem I memorized decades just a few years ago often surfaces during my own musings.  The third verse of Each in His Own Tongue by William Herbert Carruth (1859-1924) captures that feeling; at least, it has for me:                     

Like tides on a crescent sea beach, when the moon is new and thin, into our hearts high yearnings come welling and surging in;  come from the mystic ocean, whose rim no foot has trod.  Some call it longing, and others call it God.

Yearning.  Longing.  A deep, aching feeling devoid of anything that could define it.  When all is said and done, is this the total eulogy that Life will intone for each of us?

Next up:  MIM4.5a

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Quicksilver

Posted on March 11, 2012. Filed under: Humor, language, Mythology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

I suspect that recognition of his tattle-tale talents took all the fun out of it for Hermes, so he loaned those winged boots and caduceus to Mercury, his Roman cousin (face it, they had to be related in that little Peyton Place) and let him take all the press as messenger of the gods.

And that explains how the winged Mercury (Quicksilver to his buds) became so intertwined with the messenger business…   that’s my story, and I’m sticking to it.

But, it doesn’t explain why you were subjected to this strange little stroll through ancient mythology.  Pleas, let me count the ways:

  1. I truly was stranded just short of inspiration for the next segment of this cruise.  What I needed was a segue (single syllable) between Mercury (the god) and the Press/Media (self-proclaimed gods).
  2. The 9 Muses ploy did get me moving on a train of thought.  I didn’t even know about Hermes, or who the heck all those muses were, until I punched in “mercury” on my smart phone.  So, none of this was really my fault; blame Wikipedia and Mobil Britannica.
  3. It was basically just a lot of fun stringing all those thought snippets into a story of sorts.
  4. Now, really, aren’t you glad you came along for the ride?

Mercury, a lesser god, enhanced his stature by being a go-between for the big gods.  As we continue our cruise, I will use that relationship as a metaphor for present day media-expert relations.  You are in for a treat, because, in this pursuit, we will encounter such terms as litigation, pismires, journalists, reporters, pismires, yellow journalism, pismires, lawyers (yucca-pah-too-ee!  Sorry.  That was a reaction, not a noun), and even pismires, all of which put the itch in my woolen long johns.

Next up:  Ship’s itinerary – a quick review.

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Muse to the Rescue

Posted on March 6, 2012. Filed under: General Interest, Humor | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

Greek mythology.  If you went to high school, you know about all those ancient Greeks and their gods and goddesses.  They had one for everything.  Should something new come up that they had no god/goddess for, just get a couple of them together in a procreative way and, BOOM, you got tailor-made divinity (the Mount Olympus kind, not the candy).

Case in point:  Zeus, king of the gods, and Mnemosyne, goddess of memory.  Some of the arts needed a little regal backup, so out pops — not one, not two, but — NINE little misses…  uh, muses.  Here, count ’em for yourself:  Calliope, Clio, Erato, Euterpe, Melpomene, Polyhymnia, Terpsichore, Thalia, and Urania.  For your own safety, just count them, don’t try to pronounce them.  In order of appearance, their specialties are:  epic poetry, history, love poetry, lyric poetry, tragedy, sacred song, dance, comedy, and astronomy.  Hmmm.  Star gazing is one of the arts?  Maybe Urania was the one disappointment in the litter.  Hey, it can happen in any family.

Quit looking around on those navigation charts, and pay attention here.  You were warned about my lack of navigation skills and a tendency to digress in my first two posts not more than a month ago.  You’ve already booked passage, so suck it up, me bucko!

Situation here is I’ve run aground just short of Inspiration Point, and, I thought maybe one of those divine chicks might put a big boot in my, uh, CPU and get me on course.  Three of those girls are into poetry, one is a dancer, and yet another is a gospel singer;  I’m just not feeling it.  Since I’m stuck in NOW, the history major won’t work, either.  Tragedy?  Now, there you got your big downer, and I’m already at a low point.  Comedy is a frame of mind, and we previously established that I don’t have that…   the frame part.  Star gazing involves all those charts, and, we don’t really want to go there, do we?  0 for 9.  Now what?  A lot more work for SID (i.e., Ship’s Inane Digressor)?

Next:  We will get through this.

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